Insight

New storytelling formats for decolonised journalism

Revamping the way we work to create journalism with and for the people we cover, not just about them, means reinventing the tools and formats of old-school extractive reporting. New story formats can help bring the public into the process and deliver content more seamlessly to the communities where the coverage originated. Inventing a more inclusive and impactful journalism is something all newsrooms can take on — large or small, mainstream(ish) or niche.

The New Humanitarian created Whatsapp, Lebanon?, an illustrated timeline of Lebanon’s collapse told through the Whatsapp conversations of five Lebanese people, and is now handing the microphone to Yemeni people to tell the story of that war. Vice built the Unfiltered History Tour, an alternative tour of the most disputed objects at the British Museum, told by people from the countries they were taken from. The Bureau Local and the People’s Newsroom are shifting the power balance in local journalism. Editors and reporters from these newsrooms shared how they made these projects happen, the challenges and rewards along the way, and lessons they can offer to other newsrooms.

The panel featured:

Rachel Hamada, Community Organiser at The Bureau of Investigative Journalism

Annie Slemrod, Middle East Editor at The New Humanitarian

Zing Tsjeng, Editor in Chief at Vice

Organised in association with The New Humanitarian.

Has this sparked ideas for you?

Do get in touch if you want to pick up on any of these thoughts.

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